Tuesday, 17 January 2017

Chapter Five

Free machine stitchery to interpret drawings
 Image 5.1 Image-1.-1.6_thumb1 5.1_thumb
Image 5.2 Image-1.-1.6_thumb 5.2_thumb
Image 5.3 Image-1.-1.5_thumb 5.3_thumb
Image 5.4 Image-1.-1.5_thumb1 5.4_thumb
Image 5.5 Image-1.6.2_thumb 5.5_thumb
Image 5.6 Image-1.-2.1_thumb 5.6_thumb
Image 5.7 Image-1.-2.1_thumb1 5.7_thumb2
Image 5.8 Image-1.-2.3_thumb 5.8_thumb
Image 5.9 Image-1.-2.3_thumb1 5.9_thumb
Image 5.10 1.30.10_thumb 5.10_thumb
Image 5.11 1.30.10_thumb1 5.11_thumb
Image 5.12 Image-1.6.3_thumb 5.12_thumb

5-text-1_thumb5-text-2_thumb[3]
I started this chapter by choosing the drawings I thought would be best for this interpretation in stitch and have been doing them over a number of weeks.  Now I have brought all the samples together I am quite pleased with some of them.  I must remember, if I want to replicate a design I may have to transpose the stitching – see Images 5.1&2 and 5.5&6.  I have done quite a bit of cable stitch and couching as I think the texture adds to the interpretation rather than having flat stitch.  The layering under the silk in 5.10 gives a lovely effect as does the use of the jersey fabric and no hoop in 5.5.

Chapter Four

Fabric and threads – colouring and bonding
4.1
Image 4.1 - Selection of fabrics for dyeing – Calico, linen, muslin, cotton, jersey and Habotai silk
4.2
Image 4.2 - Selection of ribbons and threads for dyeing – ribbon, cotton, silk, boucle, crochet cotton, cotton thread of three different thicknesses.
4.3
Image 4.3 - Dyed fabrics using Kemtex reactive CD procion dyes
4.4
Image 4.4 - Dyed fabrics using Kemtex reactive CD procion dyes
4.5
Image 4.5 – Dyed threads and ribbons using Kemtex reactive CD procion dyes
4.6
Image 4.6 – Painted bondaweb.  Markel stick, Lumiere paint, Intense blocks, Pastel blocks, Gouache, acrylic paint and brusho.


Saturday, 8 October 2016

Chapter Three

Free Machine Stitchery
3.1
3.1 Free machining using Isocord threads in bobbin and on top.
3.2
3.2 Free machining using Isocord threads in bobbin and on top.  Whip stitch – loose bobbin tension and tighter on top.
3.3
3.3 Free machining using Isocord threads in bobbin and on top.  Zigzag and whip stitch – widest zigzag and loose bottom tension and tighter on top.
3.4
3.4 Free machining using cable stitch.  This sampler was worked from the back with wools, perle and cottons in bobbin and Isocord in top.
3.5
3.5 Free machining using sewing machine automatic patterns.
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 4:13
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 2:14
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 2:12
Cotton in bobbin Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 3.42
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 3:28
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 2:22
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 2:40
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 2:29
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Auto 3:34
Isocord top and bottom
Worked from front
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Cotton in bobbin, Isocord in top
Worked from back
Isocord top and bottom
Worked from front
Isocord top and bottom
Worked from front
Isocord top and bottom
Worked from front

Saturday, 20 August 2016

Chapter Two

Designing with shapes and layers

Make a collection of decorated papers using the methods from previous chapter and translate the shapes observed in photographs.

These are the photos I am using for this exercise

Photo 1 – Bruge                    Photo 1 – Belton                   Photo 3 – Corsham
Bruge canal 1     Belton 9     Corsham 2
Basic method
Image 2.1.1 - turquoise acrylic paint scraped back with rubber pencil to reveal heavy background of blue crayon
Image 2.1.2 – black/white acrylic paint scraped back with rubber pencil to reveal heavy background of blue crayon
2.1.1     2.1.2   
Image 2.1.3 and 2.1.4 – samples above cut and then re-assembled
2.1.3      2.1.4
Image 2.1.5 – sections from above samples re-assembled
2.1.5
Image 2.2.1, 2.2.2 & 2.2.3 – simple shapes and patterns taken from the photos above.
2.2.1      2.2.3     2.2.2

Images 2.3.1, 2.3.2 & 2.3.3 – Variety of papers and transparent trapped threads used to create shapes and patterns from photos.
2.3.1     2.3.2     2.3.3

Images 2.4.1 – photo 3 Corsham developed further.  Cut into shape of water pattern, then re-assembled.
2.4.1     2.4.2
2.4.5 
Image 2.4.5 above cut again and re-assembled a second time.
   2.4.4     2.4.6
Image 2.4.4 is then copied four times as shown in image 2.4.6
2.4.7
Previous image is cut horizontally and re-assembled in Image 2.4.7

Re-composed on foil
Cut and torn papers and transparent threads re-assembled on foil background.
Images 2.5.1 – using photo 1 Bruge
 2.5.1
Images 2.5.2a & 2.5.2b – using photo 2 Belton
2.5.2a     2.5.2b
Image 2.5.3 – using photo 3 Corsham
2.5.3
 
I have really enjoyed this chapter and I think some of the designs could be very useful.  I am particularly pleased with Images 2.4.4 and its duplication in 2.4.6.  The foil backing also looks effective and tearing the papers  in 2.5.1 and 2.5.2b left a lovely layered effect replicating the frothy water.  In 2.5.3 I assembled the design on foil as requested but I then took it further and put the results on a plain blue background.  I treated myself to some Intense Blocks recently and this was a good opportunity to have a play.